Why I want to run for French Presidency — Nicholas Sarkozy

Why I want to run for French Presidency -- Nicholas Sarkozy

Former French President, Nicolas Sarkozy, has declared his interest to seek his party’s nomination to enable him contest France’s presidential election next year.

Sarkozy lost his seat to Francois Hollande in 2012 following a neck to neck voting. He lost by a slim margin.

The highly energetic president finally broke long months of suspense when he announced his bid today.

Sarkozy gradually assumed a hardline stance on national identity and the place of Islam in France.

He clutched on the threat of terrorism to portray himself as a tough man with sufficient authority and experience to respond to tough times.

According to Sarkozy, “The next five years will be filled with danger but also with hope.

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“I feel I have the strength to lead the fight at such a turbulent moment in our history.

“France demands that you give her your all,” Sarkozy wrote.

Sarkozy is coming with tougher policies than he presented in 2012.

For instance, Sarkozy says he will be banning Muslim headscarf from universities and public companies.

He plans to limit French nationality rights of children born to foreign parents, and ban pork-free options in school canteens.

In other words, Muslim and Jewish children would no longer be offered a substitute meal.

A rather bizarre voting arrangement was struck between the far right and center.

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Anybody on the voting register can vote if they pay €2 and sign a pledge stating that they will abide by “The values of the right and center”.

Sarkozy is rather the challenger and not the preferred candidate in the primaries.

The preferred candidate is Alain Juppé, the mayor of Bordeaux and a former prime minister. Juppé, served as Sarkozy’s foreign minister.

If Sarkozy wins his party’s nomination, he will have to beat Marine Le Pen, who is expected to reach the final round of voting in the presidential election next spring.